832.791.1577

Blog

 

One of the most difficult times in our lives is watching our parents decline. When it comes to finding help, it is never an easy decision. It can also be difficult to know when it is time. Is it time to move mom?

Choosing the right care facility can be daunting. You want the best care for your family member. And you may also be concerned about the cost. This can cause feelings of guilt about wanting the best. But it is important that you know how long the money will last. So how do you know when it’s time to move mom?

Signs it’s Time to Consider Memory Care

Dementia Concern- Medication

If you are noticing subtle or not so subtle changes in your parent, it may be a sign of dementia. It’s important to keep an eye on these signs to see if they worsen or are just age-related.

 

Difficulty with Memory

 

Small changes in their memory can be a sign of onset Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. These usually are short-term memories. Where they left a certain item or where they were earlier that day.

These signs are often accompanied by their long-term memories intact. They may remember their wedding or high school days, but not why they just came into the kitchen. This can happen to anyone. But if someone you love forgets words, repeats the same story over and over and appears confused at times you may need to take notice.

 

Mood Swings

Is it time to move mom

Is It Time To Move Mom?

People often suffer from depression with early dementia. It can be frustrating for the person with dementia to remember or function as they once did. Without realizing it, they may lash out and become angry or impatient.

There may also be a change in mood and personality. Because their judgment is affected, they may start doing bizarre things or acting in ways they never have before.

And this can include apathy. They may lose interest in doing things they used to and appear listless. This is common with dementia, as people don’t want to do activities they used to like. They also may stop socializing as it can be difficult and confusing.

Is it Time to Find a Memory Care Home and Move Mom?

Your mom may seem fine one minute and lost the next. It’s never easy making the decision to find your mom some help. But it’s often for her own safety. So often, the signs of dementia are gradual and hard to miss.

If any of these sounds familiar, it’s might be time to move mom.

 

  • Getting lost or wandering off
  • Pulling away from others- not wanting to be social
  • Having accidents- constant falls, car wrecks, etc.
  • Stopped bathing or cleaning themselves
  • Household chores neglected

Are they unable to keep up with their bills? And is their laundry piling up? Sometimes, care in the home isn’t enough. Their safety must come first. Starting a fire or injuring themselves can occur far too easily.

What Type of Care Facility is Best?

 

There are plenty of memory care facilities available, depending on where you live. Your finances will play a role in your selection also. How you decide will largely depend on what your mom needs and what is available.

Small facilities vs large

move mom to a smaller facility- bigger is not better

Bigger isn’t always better. Too often, a larger facility can seem overwhelming to someone living with dementia. Moving mom to a smaller care home may be more comfortable for her.

The smaller care home usually means it feels more like home, rather than an institution. Nursing homes and large assisted living facilities may not provide all the care you need.  Additionally, there are usually not enough caregivers to give someone with dementia the care they really need.

The smaller facility strives to make its residents feel at home. Rather than long halls and rooms that feel like a hospital, smaller facilities feel like a home. At Sycamore Creek Ranch our home is centered around the kitchen and dining area. This is the heart of the home. It’s where people hang out and socialize.

And these smaller homes have better staff to patient ratio which ultimately means better care.

Smaller memory care homes will cater to those living with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Larger facilities try to cope with all mental and physical complications.

Large facilities can be confusing and overwhelming for those with memory loss. If they do tend to wander it can be difficult to locate them and lead to serious accidents or injuries.

What Do You Need?

Make sure the place you choose is licensed and has the ability to care for people with dementia. Some facilities may not have the license or the ability to properly care for dementia patients.

 

Your Checklist:

 

Ask about the level of care provided. Do they serve all levels of dementia or just a certain one?

How are caregivers trained to deal with dementia?

Will your loved one be able to remain in the home until the very end?

Does each resident get their own assessment and plan of care?

Is there help for all areas of care, like bathing, eating, and any personal care?

Are there limits and restrictions for behavior that may cause my mom to be asked to leave?

Are there a variety of activities to keep her engaged?

Be sure to ask about diet and meals, discuss any food restrictions, allergies and special needs.

Always ask about safety. Are the doors locked? Does she have access to the kitchen where there are knives and the chance of starting a fire?

 

It’s a lot to take in.

Worried About Dementia

For you and for mom. Be sure to involve your mom in as many decisions as possible. This can be difficult and confusing for her, so you need to be patient yet firm.

You want the best care possible and that means doing your homework. Ask your medical professional for recommendations and then make informed decisions based on your own research.

Ultimately, it is what’s best for mom. Come for a visit to Sycamore Creek Ranch.

 

 

 

 

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]